Symposium On Aging

2020 Symposium On Aging Events Schedule

7:30 p.m. Concert & Welcome Reception MILWAUKEE MUSAIK The virtuosic musicians of Milwaukee Musaik fulfill...

7:30 p.m.
Concert & Welcome Reception

MILWAUKEE MUSAIK

The virtuosic musicians of Milwaukee Musaik fulfill a musical niche in a spirit of collegiality, creativity, and collaboration.  Distinguished for its unusual programming and stellar musician roster, Milwaukee Musaik juxtaposes timeless classics with the new and unfamiliar.

Violinist and Conductor:   Alexander “Sasha” Mandl

 

8:30 a.m.
Registration and Coffee


9:00 a.m.
Tour of Saint John’s On The Lake


10:00 a.m.
Welcome and Presentation: Faces of Age


Session 1
10:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.
Opening Lecture (1.5 CEH)

AGEISM TODAY:  FEAR AGEISM, NOT AGING

Speaker:  Margaret Morganroth Gullette, Ph.D.

About The Speaker

MARGARET MORGANROTH GULLETTE, PH.D.

Resident Scholar, Women’s Studies Research Center Brandeis University
Author: Ending Ageism, or How Not to Shoot Old People
Winner of the MLA Prize for Independent Scholars and the APA's Florence L. Denmark Award for Contributions to Women and Aging

 

Rutgers University Press

About the Lecture

AGEISM TODAY:  FEAR AGEISM, NOT AGING

In Ending Ageism, or How Not to Shoot Old People, award-winning writer and cultural critic Margaret Morganroth Gullette confronts the ways people aging past midlife are portrayed in the media, by adult offspring; the esthetics and politics of representation in photography, film, and theater; and the incitement to commit suicide for those with early signs of “dementia.”

In this original and important lecture, Dr. Gullette will be telling stories she has heard since the book’s publication, and asking audience members how they would respond in some of those situations. Many people have a limiting idea of "ageism." If they believe it exists, they may think it is trivial. They may not recognize how they have internalized it and side with the perpetrators.  Gullette shows that some forms are now becoming government policy, and asks two main questions: If you have not experienced it, why is that? Can ageism be successfully fought? Dr. Gullette argues that overcoming ageism is an imperative social movement of our time.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the history of "ageism" as a concept and its impact on public policy.
  • Review evidence of age-related prejudice in society and its effects.
  • Understand ageism as a cultural construct rather than a natural physical and social process.
  • Acknowledge resistance to ageism as a social obligation.
  • Outline strategies for addressing the public and personal grievances of older people in our society.


12:00 p.m.
Lunch
Please join us for lunch and table discussions about today’s topic.


Session 2
1:00-2:30 p.m.
Lecture (1.5 CEH)

THE SECRET TO STAYING ALIVE:  INDEPENDENCE AND INEQUALITY IN AMERICAN HOME CARE

Speaker:  Elana D. Buch, Ph.D.

About the Speaker

ELANA D. BUCH, PH.D.

Associate Professor, Anthropology, University of Iowa,
Author: Successful Aging: A 21st Century Obsession

Dr. Elana Buch is a medical and sociocultural anthropologist at the University of Iowa. As families, communities, and nations struggle to meet the needs of our rapidly aging population, Dr. Buch studies how new forms of intimacy and care are entangled with social and health inequalities.

Dr. Buch’s first book Inequalities of Aging: Paradoxes of Independence in American Home Care (NYU Press, 2018) is an intimate account of relationships between home care workers and older adults in Chicago. Based on two years of in-depth research, Inequalities of Aging shows how the work that enables a growing number of older adults to age independently also generates profound social inequalities.

Dr. Buch was jointly trained in Anthropology and Social Work at the University of Michigan. She was a National Institute on Aging training fellow and a Hartford Geriatric Social Work Predoctoral Fellow, as well as a UCLA Social Science in Practice Postdoctoral Fellow.

About the Lecture

THE SECRET TO STAYING ALIVE:  INDEPENDENCE AND INEQUALITY IN AMERICAN HOME CARE

In this talk, Elana Buch argues that in a nation obsessed with independence, inequality is the secret to (some of us) staying alive. She will share the stories of older adults and workers in Chicago’s home care industry whom she met through two years of in-depth anthropological research. Home care is one of the fastest-growing occupations in the United States; it is also one of the most poorly paid. The gender, racial, and economic inequalities that structure the home care industry are justified by longstanding preoccupations with independence. Buch will show how these inequalities ultimately render home care relationships – and the entire industry – precarious, and offer ideas for building a sustainable care economy built on equitable interdependence.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the central role of home care in elder care and in the U.S. economy.
  • Understand links between historical and current national caregiving policy, gender/racial inequality in elder care and challenges to home care quality and stability.
  • Develop a deeper awareness of the social, emotional, and physical skills required in-home care.
  • Critically analyze the cultural value of independence and its role in shaping home care practices/policies.


2:30 p.m.
Break


Session 3
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Lecture (1.5 CEH)

RE-IMAGINING AGING THE HARD AND BEAUTIFUL WAY: LESSONS FROM DEMENTIA

Speaker:  Mark P. Freeman, Ph.D.

About the Speaker

MARK P. FREEMAN, PH.D.

Professor, Psychology, Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Society, College of the Holy Cross
Author: Hindsight: The Promise and Peril of Looking Backward and Rewriting the Self: History, Memory, Narrative
Winner of the Alpha Sigma Nu National Book Award

Mark Freeman received his B.A. in Psychology from the State University of New York at Binghamton (now Binghamton University) in 1977, his Ph.D. in the Committee on Human Development from the University of Chicago in 1986, and is currently Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Society and Professor of Psychology at the College of the Holy Cross.  His writings include Rewriting the Self: History, Memory, Narrative (Routledge, 1993), which received the Alpha Sigma Nu (Jesuit Honor Society) National Book Award in 1994; Finding the Muse: A Sociopsychological Inquiry into the Conditions of Artistic Creativity (Cambridge, 1994), designated an Outstanding Academic Book by Choice magazine in 1995; Hindsight: The Promise and Peril of Looking  Backward (Oxford, 2010); The Priority of the Other: Thinking and Living Beyond the Self (Oxford, 2014); and numerous articles and chapters on issues ranging from memory and personal identity to the psychology of art and religion.

Winner of the 2016 Distinguished Scholar Award at Holy Cross as well as the 2010 Theodore R. Sarbin Award in the Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, Professor Freeman is also a Fellow in the American Psychological Association, has served as President of both the Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology and the Society for Qualitative Inquiry in Psychology, and currently serves as Editor for the Oxford University Press series “Explorations in Narrative Psychology.”

About the Lecture

REIMAGINING AGING THE HARD AND BEAUTIFUL WAY:  LESSONS FROM DEMENTIA

In this presentation, Dr. Mark Freeman will draw upon his relationship with his mother during the dozen years of her dementia as a vehicle for re-imagining the process of aging.  Those years were difficult in many ways, for her and for him.  At the same time, they were also marked by an intimacy, an intensity, and, at times, a beauty that was unprecedented in their lives.  By sharing some important aspects of their time together, along with some of the scholarly work that inspired him throughout these difficult, beautiful years, Dr. Freeman hopes to shed some new light on both the challenges and opportunities inherent in accompanying loved ones on the journey of growing old.

This work, while certainly personal in nature, will also make significant contact with scholarly work from philosophy, theology, psychology, and beyond.  It's particularly inspired by thinkers like Martin Buber and Emmanuel Levinas.  Simone Weil and Iris Murdoch also loom large in Dr. Freeman’s thinking about these issues.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the experience of dementia, for both the person with dementia and the persons caring for them.
  • Appreciate the challenges and opportunities for care-giving that may emerge during the course of time.
  • Develop a deepened and enlarged way of viewing dementia and, in turn, the process of aging.

Acquire scholarly and practical strategies for exploring some fundamental features of the human condition


4:30 p.m.
Speakeasy – Continuing the Conversation

An opportunity for casual, creative and engaging conversation with presenters and attendees with light snacks and beverages.


7:00 p.m.
Jazz Cabaret Concert with John Harmon and Janet Planet

JAZZ CABARET
Join us for jazz, refreshments and ongoing conversations and connections.

 

8:30 a.m. Registration and Coffee 9:00 a.m. Tour of Saint John’s On The Lake 10:00...
8:30 a.m. Morning Spiritual Practices Choose one for the day: Pathways to Stillness:  Tai Chi – Gary...

8:30 a.m.
Morning Spiritual Practices
Choose one for the day:

Pathways to Stillness:  Tai Chi – Gary Irwin-Kenyon, Ph.D

Storying Our Lives – Karen Skerrett, Ph.D

Journaling as Artform – Nancy Hills, M.A.

About the Speakers and Spiritual Practices

GARY IRWIN-KENYON

These morning sessions will be based on Irwin-Kenyon’s book Pathways to Stillness.  Participants will be invited to engage in two activities. The first will consist of a series of “Relax into Stillness” movements based on Tai Chi. No experience is necessary to perform these movements and they can be done from both a seated and standing position. In the second activity, participants will be invited to “Explore Your Pathway”, which consists of a gentle guided reflection on life themes.  The sessions will be of benefit to older adults, and also to professionals working with older adults who may, of course, be older persons themselves.

Dr. Gary Irwin-Kenyon is the founding Chair of Gerontology at St. Thomas University in Fredericton New Brunswick, Canada. He is a long-time teacher and practitioner of Tai Chi. Dr. Irwin-Kenyon conducts workshops and seminars in many parts of the world to professionals and community groups. Dr. Irwin-Kenyon designed a seated program entitled “Tai Chi as Narrative Care” which he shares with special groups, including dementia survivors.

 


 

KAREN SKERRETT, PH.D.

Dr. Karen Skerrett is a licensed clinical psychologist, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, author and consultant.  Over the past 35 years, she has worked in a variety of settings from academic to business and clinical. She specializes in strength-based approaches to change with a research focus on processes of relational resilience and the development of healing narratives across the lifespan. She has run ‘The Story Project’, which collects and analyzes individual and couple stories, for the past 15 years. Holding an M.A. & Ph.D. in Human Development and Psychology from the University of Chicago, she has been on the faculties of the University of Illinois, the Chicago Center for Family Health and the University of San Diego where she developed the first doctoral program in Advanced Practice Mental Health Nursing in southern California.  Most recently she was an Associate Clinical Professor at the Family Institute/Center for Applied Psychological Studies at Northwestern University.

She has led numerous life writing groups modeled after the Guided Life Review developed by James Birren, considered one of the pioneers of gerontology, and has led “What’s Your Story” groups in business and healthcare settings for over 20 years. As a consultant for Vistage International, she co-developed and implemented Journey with Intent groups to assist executives with transitions and personal development which ran for over 10 years in both Chicago and New York City.

Dr. Skerrett is the co-author of Positive Couple Therapy: Using we-stories to enhance resilience (2014) with Jefferson Singer, published by Routledge Press and is co-editor of Couple Resilience: Emerging perspectives (2015), Skerrett & Fergus with Springer Press. She has also written the memoir: Tell me again how I know you? (2019). She has published numerous book chapters, professional articles and is a frequent presenter at national and international conferences.

 


 

NANCY HILLS, M.A.

Nancy is an Episcopal deacon, graphic designer and artist who has been doodling, drawing, coloring and lettering her way through journals for over 20 years. She is newly retired from her graphic design position with the City of Milwaukee, and is a deacon at Christ Church in Whitefish Bay. She and her husband Julian live on the westernmost edge of Milwaukee’s East Side with their two cats, Sophia and Samantha, and only slightly fewer books than the local library.

 

Journaling as Art Form

Art journals are as unique as fingerprints, and no journal is the same as the one that came before it. For many people, the written word is enough, but my heart finds its place on the page and its most powerful expression through combining writing and illustration. These journals have become a treasured and intensely personal visual record of major life events, as well as being a handy place to record class notes, jot down recipes, favorite quotations, prayers and random thoughts. After a brief tour of my own art journals, we’ll dive right into the creative process, learning about materials and page design, and what to do to get past the fear of making mistakes when faced with a new journal or fresh page. There will be handouts, and participants are encouraged to bring their favorite writing or drawing tools and their own journal to work in, but only if they already have one.

 

 

 

 


Session 4
10:00-11:45 a.m.
Lecture (2.0 CEH)

AGING BLACK:  GROWING OLD IN A POST-SOUL WORLD
Speaker:  Otis Moss III, M.Div, D.Min

About the Speaker

OTIS MOSS III, M.DIV, DMIN

Senior Pastor, Trinity United Church of Christ, Chicago, Illinois
Lyman Beecher Lecturer (Yale University)
Author: Blue Note Preaching in a Post-Soul World: Finding Hope in an Age of Despair

Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III is senior pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago. He is a preacher, activist, author and filmmaker with an eye toward justice and equality, as evidenced through the gospel of Jesus Christ. He founded the Unashamed Media Group, a justice-centered faith-based agency committed to producing and curating stories to inspire the heart and challenge the mind. His most recent book is Blue Note Preaching in a Post-Soul World: Finding Hope in an Age of Despair (2015). Dr. Moss is ordained in the Progressive National Baptist Convention and the United Church of Christ.

About the Lecture

AGING BLACK:  GROWING OLD IN A POST-SOUL WORLD

In the 400 years of their life in the United States, aging, dying and death itself has been a fundamentally different experience for African Americans than for whites or members of other ethnic groups in the country.  That experience, marked by discrimination, poverty, inadequate health care and violence has mapped a different perspective about suffering, care and mourning.  Many harbor deep distrust of the traditional health care system stemming from egregious past ethical violations. Too, African Americans, who according to research studies are the most religious racial group in the US, have significant religious concerns about the advance care strategies of currency in white-normative health care.  However, the role of the traditional church has changed dramatically over the past generation, once pervasive spiritual beliefs have eroded, leaving older black people particularly vulnerable, challenged to find hope in the midst of pervasive despair.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the historic context of religious tradition in the African American community.
  • Assess the gap in national discourse and educational efforts to serve older black persons nationwide.
  • Address the ability and relative unwillingness of providers to provide care that respects deeply-held cultural, religious and other personal values.
  • Appreciate the sources of hope among African Americans in a rapidly changing socio-cultural environment.


12:00 p.m.
Lunch

Please join us for lunch and table discussions about today’s topic.


Session 5
1:00-2:30 p.m.
Lecture (1.5 CEH)

THE NEW REALITY OF AGING DIVERSITY
Speaker:  Ronald J. Angel, Ph.D.

Speaker:  Jaqueline L. Angel, Ph.D.

About the Speakers

RONALD J. ANGEL, PH.D.

Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Texas – Austin
Author: Family, Intergenerational Solidarity, and Post-Traditional Society
Latinos in an Aging World: Social, Psychological, and Economic Perspectives

Ronald J. Angel received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin Madison in 1981.  His research interests focus on comparative social welfare, retirement, and health care systems.  His work has been published in numerous books and journal articles.  He has been involved in the development, translation, and administration of survey instruments for use in comparative studies.  He is currently involved in a study of the role of civil society organizations, both secular and faith-based, in advocating for and providing services to very low-income elders in Mexico and other nations in Latin America.

 

 

 


 

JACQUELINE L. ANGEL, PH.D.

Jacqueline L. Angel, Ph.D. is Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology and a Faculty Affiliate at the Population Research Center and LBJ School Center for Health and Social Policy at The University of Texas at Austin. Her research examines health and retirement issues in the U.S., with a focus on older minorities, immigration processes, the impact of social policy on the Hispanic population and Mexican-American families.

She is a Co-Investigator on the NIH/NIA, Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (H-EPESE), the first large-scale investigation of the longitudinal health of older Mexican Americans in the Southwestern United States and Principal Investigator of the Conference Series on Aging in the Americas: U.S. and Mexico.

Dr. Angel is author/co-author/co-editor of 80 journal articles, 30 book chapters, and 12 books. Some of her recent publications include: Family, Intergenerational Solidarity, and Post-Traditional Society (2018); Latinos in an Aging World: Aging (2015), Health and Longevity in the Mexican-origin Population (Springer Science), and “Institutional Context of Family Eldercare in Mexico and the United States” (2016). At the LBJ School she teaches courses in aging, health, and social policy.

About the Lecture

THE NEW REALITY OF AGING DIVERSITY

Western European fertility rates have reached historic lows.  In Italy and Spain, where up until a generation ago families had many children, women have 1.3 children on average, far below the 2.1 that is necessary for a stable population.  In the absence of immigration, these countries would shrink in size.  South American populations are aging at an astonishing rate as well and will continue to do so well into the twenty-first century.  This new demographic and social reality of rapid growth in the proportion of populations in the oldest age ranges requires novel approaches to the care of older adults.  Increasingly, immigrants are becoming essential to the economic productivity of high-income nations, and they will become even more essential in providing care to aging low-fertility Western populations.

This presentation and discussion focus on the cultural, economic, and political causes and consequences of immigration for the economies of high-income nations, and especially its impact on the economic and social security of older citizens.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Examine causes and consequences of international migration in the modern world, with a particular focus on Europe and the United States.
  • Assess how rapid growth in aging global populations of older adults requires new approaches to their care.
  • Appraise the impact of growing anti-immigrant sentiment in many nations today on older adults.
  • Confront the complexity of this important social process for the elder-care.


2:30 p.m.
Break


Session 6
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Panel Presentation and Discussion (1.5 CEH)

OLD, OUT AND PROUD – THE LEGACY OF LBGTQ AGING
Moderater:  Serena Worthington, M.A.

Panelists:
•   Jacqueline Boyd, B.A., B.S., C.G.C.M.
•   Loree Cook-Daniels, M.A., M.S.
•   Britta Larson, M.A.
•   Paul Masterson, M.A. (German), M.A. (History)
•   Tony Snell Rodriguez

About the Moderator and Panelists

SERENA WORTHINGTON, M.A. (MODERATOR)

Director of National Field Initiatives Services & Advocacy for LGBT Elders (SAGE), New York

Serena Worthington is the Director of National Field Initiatives at Services & Advocacy for LGBT Elders (SAGE), where she oversees the SAGE affiliate network, facilitates policy advocacy on LGBT aging issues, and strategically enhances the capacity of partner organizations across the country to work effectively on behalf of LGBT older people.

A leader in aging services and advocacy, she frequently presents at national conferences, sharing her passion and expertise on LGBT aging issues. She has been quoted in the BBC News Magazine, Business Week, Health Care Finance News, and Medill Reports.

Serena serves on the Chicago Department of Public Health’s LGBT Health Advisory Council and the Chicago Task Force on LGBT Aging.  Prior to this, Serena was the founding director of Chicago’s Center on Halsted, the Midwest’s largest LGBT community center.

Serena received her Master of Arts in Art Therapy from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago in 2002. Her undergraduate degree is from Fairhaven College where she completed an interdisciplinary concentration in art and cross-cultural psychology. She is a certified activity director and a licensed professional counselor.


JAQUELINE BOYD, B.A., B.S., C.G.C.M. (PANELIST)

President, The Care Plan, Chicago, IL

Jacqueline Boyd brings passion and expertise to the field of aging and LGBTQ+ advocacy. A dynamic speaker, facilitator and entrepreneur, Jacqueline is the owner of The Care Plan. The Care Plan (www.the-care-plan.com ) is the country's first LGBTQ+ centered care management company. The Care Plan’s innovative model of client-directed care provides advocacy, care navigation and advance planning for successful aging experiences.

As part of The Care Plan’s leadership, Jacqueline has consulted with national and local organizations including SAGE, Howard Brown Health Centers, AIDS Foundation Chicago, and Affinity Community Services to enhance services offered to LGBTQ+ older adults.

Jacqueline is a sought after speaker and author, having presented at the American Society on Aging National Conference, Creating Change Conference, the Los Angeles County Older Adult Summit, and University of Chicago among others. She recently contributed a chapter to Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Health and Aging, available from Springer Publishing and authored the guide Create Your Care Plan: An LGBT Person’s Guide To Preparing For Medical Procedures.


LOREE COOK-DANIELS, M.A., M.S. (PANELIST)

Director, Policy and Program Director, FORGE, Milwaukee, WI

Loree Cook-Daniels FORGE’s Policy and Program Director and founder of the Transgender Aging Network and Elder TG, was among the experts who collaboratively developed the elder-services training program for SAGE (Services & Advocacy for LGBT Elders).  Since 2000, she has helped design and co-facilitate FORGE’s multiple in-person and virtual support groups, research studies and programs.  She has been involved in advocacy, research, training and services for LGBTQ populations since 1975 and is nationally known for her work on aging and transgender issues.

Her policy, program and trainings have focused on aging, elder abuse, domestic violence and sexual assault.  She has published numerous book chapters, articles and online publications on these topics, and currently blogs for the Huffington Post.  She holds a B.A. in woman’s studies and history, an M.S. in conflict management and a post-graduate certificate in trauma counseling.


BRITTA LARSON, M.A. (PANELIST)

Senior Services Director, Center on Halsted, Chicago, IL

Britta Larson is the Senior Services Director at Center on Halsted, the Midwest's most comprehensive community center dedicated to building and strengthening the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) community.  Britta is responsible for overseeing the older adult programs at Center on Halsted which serves over 1,000 seniors annually.  Additionally, she supervises the programs and services that are provided the residents of Town Hall apartments, Chicago’s first LGBT-friendly senior housing.

Prior to Center on Halsted, Britta worked at a senior living community in the areas of social services and marketing.  She is a Licensed Nursing Home Administrator and holds a Master’s degree in Nonprofit Management from North Park University.

 


PAUL MASTERSON, M.A. (PANELIST)

Columnist and Commentator, The Shepherd Express, Milwaukee, WI

Paul Masterson spent his formative years in Connecticut growing up in a traditional Irish Catholic family. After graduating Marquette University with a Master’s Degree in German, he moved to Germany where for the next two decades he worked for Lufthansa German Airlines and Air Zimbabwe globetrotting as a flight attendant.  Over the years he pursued another Master’s Degree (in History) at UWM, took up cultural studies in Nyiregyhaza, Hungary and culinary training in Bangkok, Thailand.

Returning to Milwaukee in the early 1990s, Masterson immediately began his long community engagement,  volunteering as auction chairman for ARCW’s Make-A-Promise Dinner & Auction and later as the event’s co-chairman, as well as with the LGBT Community Center as an adult ally for its Project Q youth program.  He has since served on various boards of directors including Milwaukee Pride, GAMMA, and the Milwaukee Gay Arts Center, as well as team participant (SSBL, Monday Night Irregulars Bowling League, MGVA) and as communications director of the 2009 NAGAAAfest, Gay Softball World Series committee.

With his extensive experience to draw upon, he became a contributing writer to Milwaukee’s LGBTQ and mainstream press.  His beat spans the spectrum from athletics to the arts (culinary, visual and performing) and from health, politics and history to religion. His work includes theater and visual arts previews and reviews, lifestyle features and interviews with a broad range of local and national personalities. He has also published fiction and poetry. His weekly Shepherd Express opinion column, My LGBTQ POV, focuses on social justice and the broader realm of Milwaukee’s LGBTQ community affairs.


TONY SNELL RODRIGUEZ (PANELIST)

Equal Rights Commission, Milwaukee, WI

Tony Snell Rodriguez, a longtime human rights activist and community organizer, comes to Milwaukee from South Carolina, where he served as president of South Carolina Pride for several years and is a founding member of the Harriet Hancock Center Foundation. In Milwaukee, Tony is a member of the City’s Equal Rights Commission (ERC), Milwaukee Pride Board of Directors and PrideFest Production Team, and the Milwaukee LGBT Community Center Board of Directors – and has served as its interim executive director.

Over the years, Tony has served as an LGBTQ Community spokesperson while organizing initiatives and demonstrations, including an infamous trip to Bob Jones University; Pride events in Columbia, Greenville, and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; the historic inclusion of S.C. Pride in the Columbia St. Patrick’s Day Parade; and state Senate passage of a hate crime bill which included sexual orientation. In 1998, Tony was interviewed by the New York Times in a ground-breaking, front page story about LGBT political organizing in the South. Demanding transgender inclusion, he was instrumental in the crafting and passage of the City of Columbia Human Rights Ordinance – first in the state and groundbreaking in the South. Tony has also served as a founding member of both the Equality Federation (a national group of state LGBT organizations) and the F.B.I. Community Engagement Council.

While serving as the Milwaukee LGBT Center’s interim executive director, he and his staff led a community coalition ensuring the passage of Milwaukee’s ordinance banning conversion therapy work which continues at present.

Milwaukee Magazine says Tony is passionate about human rights and his Twitter account is one of ten you want to follow (@TonyEquality). A newly released book Southern Perspectives on the Queer Movement features Tony as a contributor and chronicles his coming out and advocacy.

About the Lecture

OLD, OUT AND PROUD – THE LEGACY OF LBGTQ AGING

The end of life presents unique considerations for LGBTQ+ people, including family structure, life experience, disclosure and visibility of identity and preference.  It is informed by the historic experience of people who occupy position outside the mainstream of the surrounding socio-economic and cultural environment.  This presentation will explore some of these dimensions as aspects of the growing and increasingly visible aging cohort in the community.  It draws on the personal stories and assessments of presenters whose lived experience is varied, deep and broadly representative of the LBGTQ+ community.  It will focus on the community’s strength and resilience as it suggests best practices in providing care and ways to integrate LBGTQ+ concerns in to person-centered care and connect with local and national resources.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the history of LGBTQ+ experience in the United States.
  • Describe the intersections of complex family and personal identities with access, needs and barriers to service.
  • Identify best practices for care engagement with LGBTQ+ older adults.
  • Discuss the unique challenges of planning and care at the end-of-life with families of choice and families of origin.


4:30 p.m.
Speakeasy – Continuing the Conversation

An opportunity for casual, creative and engaging conversation with presenters and attendees with light snacks and beverages.


7:00 p.m.
Theater Event and Reception

The Waverly Gallery
Directed by Marti Gobel

About the Play

The Waverly Gallery

A live theatrical performance directed by Marti Gobel. The brilliant 2019 Tony-nominated Kenneth Lonergan play about the final years of a generous, chatty and feisty grandmother’s final battle against Alzheimer’s disease. The play explores her fight to retain her independence and the subsequent effect of her decline on her family.

8:30 a.m.
Morning Spiritual Practices
Choose one for the day:

Pathways to Stillness:  Tai Chi – Gary Irwin-Kenyon, Ph.D

Storying Our Lives – Karen Skerrett, Ph.D

Journaling as Artform – Nancy Hills, M.A.


Session 7
10:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m.
Keynote Lecture (2.0 CEH)

LIFE STORY WRITING FOR ELDERS:  A FILM AND WORKSHOP
Speaker:  Thomas Cole, Ph.D.

McGovern Chair in Medical Humanities and Director of the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics, The University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX

About the Speaker

 

THOMAS COLE, PH.D.

McGovern Chair in Medical Humanities and Director of the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics, The University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX

Thomas Cole. is a historian, author, professor of medical humanities, lay chaplain, and humanistic gerontologist.  Dr. Cole has published many books and articles on the history of aging and humanistic gerontology. His book The Journey of Life: A Cultural History of Aging in America (Cambridge University Press, 1992) was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He is senior editor of What Does It Mean to Grow Old? (Duke, 1986), the Handbook of Humanities and Aging (Springer, 1992; 2nd edition, 1999), and   Voices and Visions: Toward a Critical Gerontology.  His current book project is A Country for Old Men, a book exploring the lives, ideas, and identities of contemporary male elders.

About the Lecture

LIFE STORY WRITING FOR ELDERS:  A FILM AND WORKSHOP

Dr. Cole’s presentation will consist of two parts:

  • Screening and discussion of the documentary film, “Life Stories,” a PBS production set in Galveston, Texas. It follows the process of a writing group of older adults who meet weekly and share their personal writing.  Thomas Cole and Kate deMedeiros facilitate the conversations, which are stimulated by answers to a writing prompt such as: “Write a letter to a person who has died. What do you want to say to them that you might not have been able to say when they were alive?”
  • Workshop on personal narrative writing. Here, participants will share in small groups and write in response to a prompt such as: tell about a time of trouble, transition or loss, or a time of great happiness and creative exploration.  At the end, the group as a whole will talk about the experience of writing and offer individual readings.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Use writing and storytelling as personal and professional resources for healthy aging.
  • Appreciate the role of narrative development in fostering resilience in later life.
  • Understand the generative power of preserving memories.
  • Identify practical strategies to develop writing groups among the elderly.

12:00 p.m.
Lunch

Please join us for lunch and table discussions about today’s topic.


Session 8
1:00-2:30 p.m.
Lecture (1.5 CEH)

CALLED TO CARE:  HOW MODERN FAMILIES LIVE THE HONOR COMMANDMENT
Speaker:  Amy Ziettlow

About the Speaker

AMY ZIETTLOW, M.Div.

Pastor, Holy Cross Lutheran Church Decatur, IL
Author: Homeward Bound: Modern Families, Elder Care and Loss

Amy Ziettlow is ordained in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. She is currently pastor of Holy Cross Lutheran Church in Decatur, IL and serves as a Conference Dean for their region. She is a former hospice chaplain and COO of The Hospice of Baton Rouge. Her writing has been published in The Atlantic, Slate, Huffington Post, and The Christian Century. As an Affiliate Scholar with the Institute for American Values, she led a three-year study on Generation X caregiving and grief, culminating in the publication of several co-authored articles and of the book Homeward Bound: Modern Families, Elder Care and Loss (with Naomi Cahn). In 2019, she partnered with the Center for Public Justice to research and publish, Called to Care: Honoring Elders and the Family Care Journey. 

About the Lecture

CALLED TO CARE:  HOW MODERN FAMILIES LIVE THE HONOR COMMANDMENT

As a religious law, adage, and recipe for generational reciprocity, the "honor commandment" looms large as a societal construct, especially with 76 million baby boomers in the United States approaching old age. This session explores how the honor commandment persists as a normative ethic in the lived practice of elder care and the ways that it is supported by, or at odds with, secular legal imperatives of elder care.

Much in the way that the biblical story of Ruth provides a broad interpretation of how to live the honor commandment, this interdisciplinary exploration is informed by contemporary experiences of elder care culled from ethnographic interviews as well as by theological, demographic, and legal source material. We argue that the honor commandment continues to support practical adherence to largely unknown legal obligations. Caring for aging and ill parents can impose burdens on the caretakers that secular laws often fail to alleviate, particularly because of changes in the structure of twenty-first-century families. Family members and friends who accept the call to care often do so in order to honor their loved one, but they risk exhausting their finances as well as mental and physical health. Ziettlow suggests potential reforms that could better facilitate honoring seriously ill elders and the grown children who care for them.

 

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Summarize marriage, divorce, and remarriage trends in modern families that affect the elder caregiving pool and shape family caregiving.
  • Understand that the “Honor Commandment” (honor your father and mother) continues to motivate modern caregivers.
  • Analyze three categories of the care journey: the roller coaster, the deep end, and the marathon using interviews from Called to Care.
  • Know how the social safety net (paid sick leave, family leave benefits, social security credits) can help meet the unique needs of caregivers on each care journey.
  • Update on the move towards a federal Family Medical Leave Act benefit and how that might support family caregivers.
  • Describe how faith communities can support caregivers for the aging or seriously ill adult.


2:30
Break


Session 9
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Lecture (1.5 CEH)


RIDING THE DRAGON:  PREVENTING SECONDARY STRESS AND STRENGTHENING YOUR INNER LIFE IN CHALLENGING TIMES

Speaker:  Rober J. Wicks, Ph.D.

About the Speaker

ROBERT J. WICKS, PH.D.

Author: Riding the Dragon: 10 Lessons for Inner Strength in Challenging Times,
Everyday Simplicity: An Everyday Guide to Spiritual Growth,
Perspective: The Calm Within the Storm,            
Touching the Holy and Night Call: Embracing Compassion and Hope in a
Troubled World
Overcoming Secondary Stress in Medical and Nursing Practice,
The Resilient Clinician and Bounce: Living the Resilient Life

Robert J. Wicks received his doctorate in psychology from Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital and is Professor Emeritus, Loyola University Maryland.  He has published more than 50 books for professionals and the general public, including Night Call: Embracing Compassion and Hope in a Troubled World (Oxford, 2018); Perspective: The Calm within the Storm (Oxford, 2014); Bounce: Living the Resilient Life (Oxford, 2010); and Riding the Dragon (Sorin Books, 2003/2013).

Dr. Wicks has lectured on the importance of resilience, self-care, and maintaining a healthy perspective in Hanoi, Beijing, Port au Prince, Johannesburg, Phnom Penh, and Budapest as well as at the Mayo Clinic, Harvard’s Children’s Hospital and Harvard Divinity School, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the U.S. Air Force Academy, on Capitol Hill to Members of Congress and their Chiefs of Staff and most recently in Beirut to persons living and working in Aleppo, Syria.  He has also served on the faculty of Bryn Mawr College’s Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research and received the Humanitarian of the Year Award from the American Counseling Association’s Division on Spirituality, Ethics, and Values. In 2006 was recipient of the first annual Alumni Award for Excellence in Professional Psychology from Widener University.

About the Lecture

RIDING THE DRAGON:  PREVENTING SECONDARY STRESS AND STRENGTHENING YOUR INNER LIFE IN CHALLENGING TIMES

One of the greatest gifts we can share with others is a sense of our own peace. However, we can’t share what we don’t have. By discussing psychological and classical spiritual approaches to maintaining perspective and inner strength in challenging times, Dr. Wicks, an expert on the prevention of secondary stress (the pressures experienced in reaching out to others) and author of Perspective: The Calm within the Storm; Bounce: Living the Resilient Life and Riding the Dragon, offers insights into how we can live in peace and, in turn, extend our warmth to others without losing our own inner fire in the process. Topics will include: maintaining a healthy sense of perspective; avoiding dangers that lead to unnecessary stress; developing your own self-care program; knowing the 4 “voices” we need in our circle of friends to have balance and courage in life; improving self-awareness; facing inner darkness; and developing a richer reflective practice.  Practical, illustrative, lively, this rich presentation will provide essential information on resilience, compassion, and personal wellbeing.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Know the 4 types of friends necessary to have in one’s interpersonal support network as a way to enhance personal/professional resiliency.
  • Appreciate the difference between chronic and acute secondary stress.
  • Describe a self-care protocol and some of the key elements of its content.
  • Define “mindfulness” in the context of aging and self-care.


4:30 p.m.
Speakeasy – Continuing the Conversation

An opportunity for casual, creative and engaging conversation with presenters and attendees with light snacks and beverages.


7:00 p.m.
Film Screening and Reception

GenSILENT

The critically-acclaimed documentary that reveals older LGBTQ people going back into the closet because they are afraid of the people caring for them.

Discussion with:  Producers, Joe Applebaum and Stu Maddux
The Clowder Group, San Francisco, CA

8:30 a.m. Morning Spiritual Practices Choose one for the day: Pathways to Stillness:  Tai Chi – Gary...
8:30 a.m. Morning Spiritual Practices Choose one for the day: Pathways to Stillness:  Tai Chi – Gary...

8:30 a.m.
Morning Spiritual Practices
Choose one for the day:

Pathways to Stillness:  Tai Chi – Gary Irwin-Kenyon, Ph.D

Storying Our Lives – Karen Skerrett, Ph.D

Journaling as Artform – Nancy Hills, M.A.


Session 10
10:00 a.m.-12:00 a.m.
Lecture and Premier Screening (2.0 CEH)

ALL THE LONELY PEOPLE
First-look screening with discussion by director Stu Maddux and producer Joseph Applebaum

About the Speakers

JOSEPH APPLEBAUM, PRODUCER

Joseph Applebaum is a television broadcast producer and documentary filmmaker with over 20 years of experience in the national entertainment industry covering most formats of the unscripted genre.  Past clients have included Buena Vista Entertainment (Disney), Merv Griffin Entertainment, Comedy Central, MTV, LOGO, BET, FX, Lifetime, NBC, CBS and FOX networks.  Applebaum is a graduate of the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts and is a native of Mill Valley, California.


 

STU MADDUX, DIRECTOR

Stu Maddux is an award-winning producer and director of non-fiction media with international credits including PBS, Showtime, TLC, VH1, Spike, Logo, CMT, and the BBC.  His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Atlantic, VICE and NPR’s Morning Edition among others. His honors include seven regional Emmy Awards, as well as awards from film festivals around the world.  Maddux is an outspoken activist for the LGBTQ aging and LGBTQ history movements. He has spoken at national conferences including the American Psychological Association and the American Society on Aging.  He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism and lives with his husband, Joe (see above), in San Francisco.

 


Their work together:  After giving up careers in Los Angeles, Joe and Stu moved to San Francisco and began The Clowder Group. A small production company that successfully uses documentary film to create social change.  Their roster includes the groundbreaking documentary about older LGBT people going back into the closet, Gen Silent. This was screened at VCPEA’s statewide conference in 2017.

 

About the Lecture

ALL THE LONELY PEOPLE

First-look screening with discussion by director Stu Maddux and producer Joseph Applebaum.

Everyone gets lonely and feels isolated at various times in life. It’s perfectly natural and for most of us it passes. But for some of us from all walks of life it persists and can have serious debilitating effects both psychological and physical. It can even be deadly. Chronic loneliness and isolation is now a growing worldwide epidemic. Loneliness is a feeling now as frequent as happiness for millions of us around the world.

“All The Lonely People” is the first deep-dive documentary into a bad feeling that's getting worse for millions of us. It probes not only the causes of the problem but what is being done to fight it and the solutions taking root.

A handful of people from different walks of life and different life stages offer the cameras intimate access to their struggle to overcome crippling loneliness and isolation with the help of innovative new programs and practices that if used in enough places, may make millions of us feel like we belong again.  Each person is pulled out of isolation by a different innovative solution.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand why loneliness is an issue that requires intervention on a community and personal level.
  • Know actionable steps to reduce loneliness and isolation among the people attendees serve.
  • Have knowledge of programs around the world that can be emulated in their communities.
  • Know their own level of loneliness and how to assess loneliness in others.

 


12:00 p.m.
Lunch

Please join us for lunch and table discussions about today’s topic.


Session 11
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Lecture (1.5 CEH)

REDEMPTION AND ACCEPTANCE:  TWO STORIES THAT PROMOTE CLEAR-EYED (AND HEALTHY) AGING IN AMERICA TODAY
Speaker:  Dan McAdams, Ph.D.

About the Speaker

DAN MCADAMS, PH.D.

Henry Wade Rogers Professor of Psychology
Professor of Human Development and Social Policy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Author: The Redemptive Self: Stories Americans Live By (Oxford University Press, 2006)

Dan P. McAdams is the Henry Wade Rogers Professor of Psychology and Professor of Human Development and Social Policy at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.  He was Chair of the Psychology Department 2009-15.  Author of nearly 300 scientific articles and chapters, numerous edited volumes, and 7 books, Professor McAdams works in the areas of personality and life-span developmental psychology.  His theoretical and empirical writings focus on concepts of self and identity in contemporary American society and on themes of power, intimacy, redemption, and generativity across the adult life course.  He has pioneered research on the manifestation and development of life stories, especially in midlife and older adults.

Professor McAdams is the author most recently of The Art and Science of Personality Development (2015) and The Redemptive Self:  Stories Americans Live By (2006/2013).  His book, The Strange Case of Donald J. Trump:  A Psychological Reckoning, will be published in early 2020, by Oxford University Press.   Professor McAdams has won numerous awards in personality and developmental psychology including the Henry A. Murray Award for the study of lives, the Theodore Sarbin Award for theoretical innovations, the Jack Block Award for career contributions to personality psychology, and the 2006 William James Award for best general-interest book in psychology, for The Redemptive Self.  His work has been featured in many popular venues, including The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, and he has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, NPR, and many other television and radio venues.

About the Lecture

REDEMPTION AND ACCEPTANCE:  TWO STORIES THAT PROMOTE CLEAR-EYED (AND HEALTHY) AGING IN AMERICA TODAY

People create meaning in their lives through stories.  Internalized self-narratives – what psychologists call narrative identities – connect the remembered past with the imagined future, providing our lives with some degree of unity, purpose, and coherence.  In modern societies with long life expectancies, how do late-midlife and older adults make narrative sense of life?  Research in life-span developmental psychology suggests that aging adults may find fulfillment and meaning in two sharply different narrative forms, both of which are shaped by gender, class, and race/ethnicity.  In stories of redemption, a gifted and deeply principled protagonist overcomes adversity and transforms suffering into positive outcomes.  In stories of acceptance, a humble and graceful protagonist learns that life cannot be fully controlled and that suffering must be managed rather than redeemed.  Whereas stories of commitment provide psychological support for generativity in adulthood, stories of acceptance may support wisdom, intimacy, and ego integrity.  The two story forms compete with each other as cultural master narratives, each presenting a template for aging well and living a good life in America today.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Acquire a template for healthy aging expressed in narrative identities.
  • Appreciate the latest research trends in life-span psychology on late-life development of the self.
  • Analyze the roles of stories of commitment and stories of acceptance by which aging adults create meaning and significance in life.


2:30 p.m.
Break


Session 12
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Lecture (1.5 CEH)

THE ART OF COMMUNITY
Speaker:  Charles H. Vogl, M.Div.

About the Speaker

CHARLES H. VOGL, M.DIV.

Lecturer, Yale Law School, Yale Law Project
Author, The Art of Community – Seven Principles for Belonging

Charles’ experiences include international human rights advocacy, social change leadership and producing internationally awarded nonfiction media. He studied business management and spiritual traditions at Yale University. He is a regular guest lecturer at the Yale School of Management and Yale Leadership Institute.  His book The Art of Community (Berrett-Koehler 2016) won the Nautilus Silver Award in Business & Leadership. His newest book is Storytelling for Leadership (Apocryphile Press 2019).

About the Lecture

THE ART OF COMMUNITY

Strong communities help people support one another, avoid loneliness and isolation, share their passions, and achieve big goals.

But what defines a community and how is community changing in America?

Strong cultures, too, help people support one another, build networks of common acquaintance, share their passions, and achieve big goals. And such communities aren’t just happy accidents – they can be purposefully cultivated, whether they’re in a company, a faith institution, or among friends and enthusiasts.

But what makes a “belonging culture” in times of social, sexual political, spiritual and generational change?

Charles Vogl will discuss these questions and introduce fundamental ideas from his book, The Art of Community. He will lay out the inner workings of successful communities and how they work drawing on real-life examples from both online and in-person groups.

With wisdom distilled from 3,000 years of spiritual tradition, Vogl shows how anyone can build loyalty, strengthen identity, create meaning and inspire powerful connections in critical relationships to produce the kind of change that impacts generations.

At the close of this session, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the meaning of community and a “belonging culture” in a rapidly changing social structure.
  • Learn how loyalty, strengthened collective identity and shared purpose provide foundations for strong cultures.
  • Describe how individuals can create powerful, change-oriented connections in personal relationships.
  • Examine how dimensions of historic tradition, common practice, and life’s trajectory generate the wisdom of the elderly in modern community.


4:30 p.m.
Speakeasy – Continuing the Conversation

An opportunity for casual, creative and engaging conversation with presenters and attendees with light snacks and beverages.


7:00 p.m.
Concert and Reception

The Greater Galilee Baptist Church Choir
From one of the oldest African American churches in Milwaukee, the Greater Galilee Baptist Church Choir carries forward the intensity and spiritual power of the gospel music tradition.  Jubilant and soul-satisfying, the music of the Black Church continues to lift the spirit and call forth both compassion and courage in changing times.